Rashida Ng, R.A.

Rashida Ng

Rashida Ng, R.A.

Professor Ng’s research and creative activities broadly explore the potential for sustainable and performative architecture. In response to the environmental mandate for more ecological means of architectural production, her work negotiates the complex interrelationships between constructed and natural systems.  She has authored numerous papers on these topics and co-edited the book, Performative Materials in Architecture and Design, published by Intellect in 2013.

Professor Ng’s work consciously resists an over reliance on quantifiable metrics that can be reductive in nature, as it interrogates the concurrence of technical and poetic possibilities in direct acknowledgment of the primacy of human experience within architecture. Though rooted in the fundamental principles of building science, her research challenges conventional methods of building construction and seeks to promote material invention and technical advancement within the field.  Much of this research has focused on phase change material and advanced lighting technologies. Through investigations of both the measurable and experiential characteristics of these nascent material technologies, her research explores the architectural and spatial possibilities proposed by these advancements. She previously won Gimme Shelter, an International Design-Build Competition, for her entry, Firefly, designed in collaboration with the artist Nami Yamamoto. Her work has been funded by grants from the Pennsylvania Green Building Alliance, the Architectural Research Centers Consortium, and the Vice-Provost for the Arts at Temple University.

Professor Ng received a Master of Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania and Bachelor of Science in Architecture from the Georgia Institute of Technology. She is a registered architect with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.  Prior to joining the faculty of the Tyler School of Art, she worked at architecture firms in Georgia, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania.  Professor Ng is Co-founder and President of the non-profit organization SEAMLab, a collaborative think tank dedicated to research and the dissemination of design-based knowledge focused on materiality within the built environment.