Division of Architecture and Environmental Design formed in Tyler School of Art

Back to Blog February 2, 2016

Division of Architecture and Environmental Design formed in Tyler School of Art

Author: Steven Schrayer
Photo of Masters Students examining parcel map

The interdisciplinary Division of Architecture and Environmental Design brings together landscape architecture and horticulture, community and regional planning, architecture and the Center for Sustainable Communities. There is an essential commonality among Temple University’s departments of Architecture, Community and Regional Planning, and Landscape Architecture and Horticulture, as well as the Center for Sustainable Communities: Through hands-on education and research, each is dedicated to ensuring that built and natural environments work together as a whole.

Recognizing the connections among those units, the Temple University Board of Trustees approved the transition of the Department of Landscape Architecture and Horticulture and the Department of Community and Regional Planning to the Tyler School of Art. They will reside with the Department of Architecture and the Center for Sustainable Communities in the newly formed Division of Architecture and Environmental Design.

 “We aim to put Temple and Tyler on par with other highly ranked programs focusing on the built environment,” said Hester Stinnett, TYL ’82, Tyler’s interim dean. “The division provides us with the opportunity to build interdisciplinary graduate programs in sustainability, urban design, and other built and natural environment fields; increase enrollment; and expand the Center for Sustainable Communities’ research base.”  

McGarvey stressed that administratively, the Department of Landscape Architecture and Horticulture, Department of Community and Regional Planning and the Center for Sustainable Communities will remain at Temple University Ambler, while offering programs and courses at Main, Ambler, Center City and Harrisburg campuses. 

“Landscape architecture and horticulture and community and regional planning have been crucial parts of our campus history,” she said. “The Division of Architecture and Environmental Design will be just as important for our future.”   Photo credit: Joseph V. Labolito