Lecture Series

Critical Dialogues Presents: Jane Irish

Jane Irish's art invites confrontations between realms that rarely collide. Painting in egg tempera on large-scale canvas, paper and Tyvek, she infuses sumptuous interiors with memories of colonialism and orientalism. Irish incorporates imagery from her own travels through France and Vietnam, manipulating depth and angle to blur distinctions between inside and outside, landscape and décor. She further interweaves these labyrinthine interiors with the motifs and poetry of Vietnam War veterans, an impulse that began in 2005, when she organized the exhibition Operation Rapid American Withdrawal in response to the invasion of Iraq. Alongside her elusive and yet alluring painting output, Irish creates ceramic vases that address these questions of beauty and meaning through decorative and cultural patterns.

Jane Irish received her MFA from Queens College, CUNY, and has exhibited in New York and Philadelphia since 1983. Irish has had a solo exhibition at Morris Gallery, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and has been included in exhibits at the Walker Art Center, MN; Institute of Contemporary Art, PA; Delaware Center for Contemporary Art; Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans; Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinatti; the Utah Museum of Fine Arts; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and the Baltimore Museum of Art. She has been the recipient of several prestigious grants, including a Pew Fellowship in the Arts, a Painters and Sculptors Grant from the Joan Mitchell Foundation, a Painting Fellowship from the Pennsylvania Council of the Arts, and a Painting Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts.

  • Date & Time

    2018-04-18 6:00pm to 8:00pm
  • Location

    Tyler B004
  • Category

Critical Dialogues Presents: Suzanne McClelland

Since the late 1980s, Suzanne McClelland has exhibited her work extensively in the United States and abroad. Her practice includes both large-scale paintings and works on paper, often extracting fragments of speech or text from various political and cultural sources and exploring the symbolic and material possibilities that reside within language. Her work has been the subject of solo presentations at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the Orlando Museum of Art in Florida, and the subject of an exhibition at the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art opening, March 5th running through September 2017. Her paintings are held in numerous public collections, among them the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Brooklyn Museum; the Yale University Art Gallery, the Albright-Knox Gallery in Buffalo, and the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. McClelland has twice participated in the Whitney Biennial, in 1993 and 2014, and was included in The New Museum’s exhibition NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star.  Awards include Lab Grant Residency at Dieu Donné in New York, Visiting Artist Residency UrbanGlass, Brooklyn, Nancy Graves Grant,  American Academy of Arts and Letters, AWAW Award and PS1Clocktower.

Currently, she teaches at the Department of Visual Arts at Columbia University. She has been a faculty member in the Masters of Fine Arts program at the School of Visual Arts since 1997  and has been a member of the Board of Governors at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture since 1999.

In 2016 team gallery, Inc. Published "36-24-36", a monograph with text contribution by Thierry de Duve and distributed by D.A.P. McClelland is represented by Team Gallery, Inc. and her work can be seen at Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago. In 2015 McClelland was awarded  the Lab Grant Residency at Dieu Donné Papermill in New York City, and in 2016 received an artist in residency at Urban Glass, Brooklyn, NY.

  • Date & Time

    2018-04-04 6:00pm to 8:00pm
  • Location

    Tyler B004
  • Category

Critical Dialogues Presents: Mira Schor

Mira Schor is a New York-based artist and writer noted for her advocacy of painting in a post-medium visual culture and for her contributions to feminist art history.

Schor’s work balances political and theoretical concerns with formalist and material passions. Her work has included major periods in which gendered narrative and representation of the body have been featured, in other periods the focus of her work has been representation of language in drawing and paintings. In both painting and writing, Schor's areas of interest include the gendered production of art history, the analysis and praxis of painting in post-modern culture, and the relationship between political and conceptual concerns with the materiality of expression. Schor's recent paintings are philosophical meditations on the place of painting in contemporary culture, on the visual artist as a thinker, on painting as a uniquely sensual space for the visualization of thought itself. She addresses the terms of contemporary psychic, theoretical, and economic spaces as they affect creativity. The central theme in these paintings is the experience of living in a moment of radical inequality, austerity, and accelerated time, set against the powerful pull of older notions of time, craft, and visual pleasure.

Schor received her MFA in painting from CalArts in 1973. She is the recipient of awards in painting from the Guggenheim, Rockefeller, Marie Walsh Sharpe, and the Pollock-Krasner Foundations and of the College Art Association’s Frank Jewett Mather Award in Art Criticism.

Schor has had solo exhibitions in New York City at Momenta Art, Edward Thorp Gallery, and Horodner Romley Gallery, and her work has been included in exhibitions at the Santa Monica Museum, the Armand Hammer Museum, P.S.1, the Neuberger Museum, and the Aldrich Museum. She has exhibited her work at Marvelli Gallery in New York City and is represented by CB1 Gallery in Los Angeles.

Schor is the author of A Decade of Negative Thinking: Essays on Art, Politics, and Daily Life, Wet: On Painting, Feminism, and Art Culture, editor of The Extreme of the Middle: Writings of Jack Tworkov, and co-editor of M/E/A/N/I/N/G: An Anthology of Artists' Writings, Theory, and Criticism and M/E/A/N/I/N/G Online. She is an Associate Teaching Professor in the MFA Fine Arts Program at Parsons The New School For Design.

Schor was awarded a Creative Capital / Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant in 2009 to develop A Year of Positive Thinking, a blog which includes writings on contemporary art and culture to accompany and provide a positive counterpoint to the publication of her book A Decade of Negative Thinking: Essays on Art, Politics, and Daily Life.

  • Date & Time

    2018-03-21 6:00pm to 8:00pm
  • Location

    Tyler B004
  • Category

Critical Dialogues Presents: Barb Smith

Barb Smith (b. 1979) is a Ridgewood, Queens based artist born in Kokomo, Indiana. Her work exists in a wide range of media including photography, video, and sculpture and invites reflection on one’s relationship to the material world as navigated by and through the body. Exhibitions include Apperception at Purdue University (solo), Unexpired Time at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Mesa, AZ (solo) as well as selected group exhibitions at the Queens Museum (Queens, NY), Brennan & Griffin (NY,NY), Páramo Gallery (Guadalajara, Mexico), Vox Populi (Philadelphia, PA), A.I.R. Gallery (NY, NY), The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (Chicago, IL), Bellevue Arts Museum (Bellevue, WA), UICA (Grand Rapids, MI), and CoCA Seattle (Seattle, WA). Smith was awarded a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Sculpture (2011) and attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture (2012). Her writing has been featured in The Shawangunk Review, No Dear Magazine, The Saint Lucy, Makhzin, and The Brooklyn Rail. She received a Master of Fine Arts in Sculpture from Bard College. Smith lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. Recently Smith has had solo exhibitions at 315 Gallery in Brooklyn, NY and Paramo Galeria in Guadalajara, Mexico.

  • Date & Time

    2018-03-14 6:00pm to 8:00pm
  • Location

    Tyler B004
  • Category

Critical Dialogues Presents: Josephine Halvorson

Josephine Halvorson makes paintings on-site, face to face with an object in its environment. Often no more than an arm’s length away, she detects variations in texture, light, and temperature, transcribing these perceptions through the medium of paint. The result is an intimate portrait of the object, capturing both a natural likeness as well as the often unseen or overlooked character of her chosen subject.

Halvorson grew up on Cape Cod, where she first studied art on the beaches of Provincetown and with Barnet Rubenstein at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. She attended The Cooper Union School of Art (BFA, 2003), Yale Norfolk (2002), and continued her interdisciplinary education at Columbia University’s School of the Arts (MFA, 2007). Halvorson has been awarded a number of prestigious residencies including a Fulbright Fellowship to Austria (2003-4); a Harriet Hale Woolley Scholarhip at the Fondation des États-Unis, Paris (2007-8); Moly-Sabata in Sablons, France (2014, 2017); and the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation in Captiva, Florida (2016). She was also the first American to receive the Rome Prize at the French Academy at the Villa Medici, Rome, Italy (2014-2015).

Halvorson’s work has been exhibited widely. In 2015 she presented her first museum survey exhibition, Slow Burn, at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art in Winston-Salem, NC, curated by Cora Fisher. In 2016 she exhibited large-scale painted sculptures at Storm King Art Center, as part of the “Outlooks” series curated by Nora Lawrence. Her work has been written about extensively in various publications and she is one of the subjects of Art21's documentary series, New York Close Up.

Josephine Halvorson has taught at The Cooper Union, Princeton University, the University of Tennessee Knoxville Columbia University, and Yale University. In 2016 Halvorson joined Boston University as Professor of Art and Chair of Graduate Studies in Painting. She lives and works in Western Massachusetts.

 

  • Date & Time

    2018-02-28 6:00pm to 8:00pm
  • Location

    Tyler B004
  • Category

Critical Dialogues Presents: Didier William

Didier William is originally from Port-au-prince Haiti. He received his BFA in painting from The Maryland Institute College of Art and an MFA in painting and printmaking from Yale University School of Art. His work has been exhibited at the Bronx Museum of Art, The Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach, The Fraenkel Gallery, Frederick and Freiser Gallery, and Gallery Schuster in Berlin. He was an artist in residence at the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation in Brooklyn, NY and has taught at Yale School of Art, Vassar College, Columbia University, and SUNY Purchase. He is currently Associate Professor of Art and the Chair of the MFA Program at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia.

  • Date & Time

    2018-02-21 6:00pm to 8:00pm
  • Location

    Tyler B004
  • Category

Critical Dialogues Presents: Roddy Bogawa

Born and raised in Los Angeles, Japanese American artist Roddy Bogawa (b. 1962) studied art and sculpture and played in punk bands before turning to film. In his youth, Bogawa struggled with a desire to assimilate until the punk scene gave him a way to truly express himself, and the DIY punk aesthetic continues to influence his work. Other influences include Andy Warhol, the1970s avant-garde, and filmmakers like Chris Marker, Jean Luc Godard, and Yasujiro Ozu. He currently lives in New York City and works as a Professor at New Jersey City University.

Bogawa’s work explores internal conflict, the relationship between individuals and their environment, and how identity is shaped by culture and history. He casts non-actors and actors side by side and layers his stories with metaphors, abstract material, and multiple narrative voices. His feature-length films, a unique blend of experimental and narrative styles, range from loosely (Some Divine Wind) and strictly (I Was Born, But …) autobiographical to science fiction (Junk) to documentary (Taken by Storm: The Art of Storm Thorgerson and Hipgnosis). Bogawa’s survey screening series, “If Films Could Smell” took place at MoMA in 2013.

  • Date & Time

    2018-02-14 6:00pm to 8:00pm
  • Location

    Tyler B004
  • Category

Critical Dialogues Presents: Mike Cloud

Mike Cloud is a New York based painter whose work examines the conditions of painting in its contemporary life among countless reproductions, symbols and descriptions. Cloud earned his MFA from Yale University School of Art and a BFA from the University of Illinois-Chicago. A selection of exhibitions include: ‘Special Project: Mike Cloud’ at P.S.1, NY; ‘Agreement and Subjectivity’ at Max Protetch, NY; ‘Jesse Chapman/ Mike Cloud’ at Marianne Boesky Gallery, NY and ‘Bad Faith and Universal Technique’ at Thomas Erben Gallery, NY. His work has been included in group exhibitions such as ‘Frequency’ at the Studio Museum in Harlem, NY; at Apexart, NY and Honor Fraser Gallery, CA. Cloud’s works and writing have been featured in the New York Times, Art in America, Art Review and in the painting survey Painting Abstraction by Bob Nickas, published by Phaidon Press.

He has been awarded the inaugural Chiaro Award from the Headlands Center for the Arts, CA; a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship and residencies at the Meulensteen Art Centre in the Netherlands as well as the Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program in New York. Cloud has lectured extensively on his work and issues of contemporary art theory at the Mason GrossSchool of the Arts at Rutgers University, NJ; The School of the Museum of Fine Arts, MA; Yale University, CT; Cooper Union, NY; Bard College, NY and The University of Illinois- Chicago, IL, among others. He is currently an assistant professor at Brooklyn College/ CUNY in New York.

 

  • Date & Time

    2018-02-07 6:00pm to 8:00pm
  • Location

    Tyler B004
  • Category

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