Lecture Series

LECTURE: Clifton Fordham: "Learning from Postwar Building Enclosures"

Clifton Fordham is an assistant professor of architecture at Tyler. He is the editor of the book Constructing Building Enclosures: Architectural History, Technology and Poetics in the Postwar Era. In addition to forming the practice Clifton Fordham Architect, he has worked in the offices of KieranTimberlake, Voith & Macta-vish, Rafael Vinoly, and Gensler. His primary research area is integrated building design, building enclosures and architectural detailing with a focus on details that regulate the sun.

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Critical Dialogue Series: Emma Nishimura

Attention Tyler and Temple students: Emma Nishimura’s work ranges from traditional etchings, archival pigment prints, drawings and audio pieces to art installations. Using a diversity of media, her work addresses ideas of memory and loss that are rooted within family stories and inherited narratives. Nishimura’s lecture is held in conjunction with the city-wide Japan/Philly2020 events. 

 

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Partially supported through the General Activity Fund. In partnership with Tyler’s Printmaking Program.
Image: “Lillian Michiko Blakey” (2018) by Emma Nishimura. Courtesy of the artist.

Critical Dialogue Series: Las Nietas de Nonó

Attention Tyler and Temple students: Sisters Mulowayi and Mapenzi are Las Nietas de Nonó. Stemming from an Afro-Diasporic experience in the island-colony context, especially by circumstances and elements that are present in their neighborhoods, they evoke personal archives via an intersection of disciplines to expose the systemic oppressions that racialized people have lived through generations.

 

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Partially supported through the General Activity Fund. In partnership with Tyler’s Art Education and Community Arts Practices Department.
Image courtesy of the artist. Photo by David Moses.

Critical Dialogue Series: Shaun Leonardo

Attention Tyler and Temple students: Shaun Leonardo’s multidisciplinary approach negotiates societal expectations of manhood, namely definitions surrounding black and brown masculinity, along with its notions of achievement, collective identity and experience of failure. His performance practice, anchored by his work in Assembly—a diversion program for court-involved youth at the Brooklyn-based, non-profit Recess—is participatory and invested in a process of embodiment.

 

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Partially supported through the General Activity Fund. In partnership with Tyler’s Art History Program.
Image: “Primitive Games” performance, 1 hour at Guggenheim Museum, New York, NY, June 21, 2018. Photo by Paula Court.