Lecture Series

Critical Dialogue Series: Emma Nishimura

Attention Tyler and Temple students: Emma Nishimura’s work ranges from traditional etchings, archival pigment prints, drawings and audio pieces to art installations. Using a diversity of media, her work addresses ideas of memory and loss that are rooted within family stories and inherited narratives. Nishimura’s lecture is held in conjunction with the city-wide Japan/Philly2020 events. 

 

REGISTER HERE

 

Partially supported through the General Activity Fund. In partnership with Tyler’s Printmaking Program.
Image: “Lillian Michiko Blakey” (2018) by Emma Nishimura. Courtesy of the artist.

Virtual Lecture: Geoffrey Jackson Scott

Creative producer and engagement strategist Geoffrey Jackson Scott is co-founder and creative director of Peoplmovr—a creative studio specializing in engagement and communications that partners with artists, organizations and communities on the development and delivery of strategies designed to bring arts and culture closer to the people and people closer to arts and culture. He and the studio have designed community engagement strategies for public performance and visual arts projects with museums, theatre companies and public spaces. 

Scott will talk about integrating his commitment to undoing racism and centering the principles of equity and inclusion in all areas of his practice. 

Email professor Linda Earle at linda.earle@temple.edu to receive the Zoom link.

Geoffrey Jackson Scott, Centering Principles of Equity and Inclusion

Geoffrey Jackson Scott is a creative producer, engagement strategist, and co-founder of Peoplmovr—a creative studio specializing in engagement and communications that partners with artists, organizations and communities on the development and delivery of strategies designed to bring arts and culture closer to the people and people closer to arts and culture. He and the studio have designed community engage-
ment strategies for public performance and visual arts projects with museums, theatre companies and public spaces.

Scott will talk about integrating his commitment to undoing racism and centering the principles of equity and inclusion in all areas of his practice.

Email Professor Linda Earle at linda.earle@temple.edu to receive the Zoom link.

This lecture is supported by Temple University's General Activities Fund, through the Department of Art History.

The lecture is free and open to the public.

Critical Dialogue Series: Las Nietas de Nonó

Attention Tyler and Temple students: Sisters Mulowayi and Mapenzi are Las Nietas de Nonó. Stemming from an Afro-Diasporic experience in the island-colony context, especially by circumstances and elements that are present in their neighborhoods, they evoke personal archives via an intersection of disciplines to expose the systemic oppressions that racialized people have lived through generations.

 

REGISTER HERE

 

Partially supported through the General Activity Fund. In partnership with Tyler’s Art Education and Community Arts Practices Department.
Image courtesy of the artist. Photo by David Moses.

Esther Grisham Grimm

Esther Grisham Grimm is director of 3Arts in Chicago, a social justice and arts organization advocating for women artists, artists of color and artists with disabilities working in the performing, teaching and visual arts. Grimm will discuss her work leading the transformation of what was The Three Arts Club of Chicago, an organization founded by women in 1912, to one with an expansive embrace of inclusion that centers artists in a time of great  social and demographic change.   

To RSVP and to receive the event link, please contact Professor Linda Earle at linda.earle@temple.edu and use the subject line: Grimm.

Esther Grisham Grimm discusses her work leading the transformation of what was The Three Arts Club of Chicago

Esther Grisham Grimm is director of 3Arts in Chicago, a social justice and arts organization advocating for women artists, artists of color and artists with disabilities working in the performing, teaching and visual arts. Grimm will discuss her work leading the transformation of what was The Three Arts Club of Chicago, an organization founded by women in 1912, to one with an expansive embrace of inclusion that centers artists in a time of great social and demographic change.

To RSVP and to receive the event link, please contact
Professor Linda Earle at linda.earle@temple.edu and use the subject line: Grimm.

This lecture is free and open to the public; it is supported by the Art HIstory Department and Temple University General Activities Fund.

Critical Dialogue Series: Shaun Leonardo

Attention Tyler and Temple students: Shaun Leonardo’s multidisciplinary approach negotiates societal expectations of manhood, namely definitions surrounding black and brown masculinity, along with its notions of achievement, collective identity and experience of failure. His performance practice, anchored by his work in Assembly—a diversion program for court-involved youth at the Brooklyn-based, non-profit Recess—is participatory and invested in a process of embodiment.

 

REGISTER HERE

 

Partially supported through the General Activity Fund. In partnership with Tyler’s Art History Program.
Image: “Primitive Games” performance, 1 hour at Guggenheim Museum, New York, NY, June 21, 2018. Photo by Paula Court.