Lecture Series

Critical Dialogue Series: Sarah Kavage

Sarah Kavage is a visual artist, urban planner and cultural organizer whose practice addresses place, ephemerality and ecology. She uses large-scale gestures and social engagement to shape public dialogue. Kavage is currently designing a series of ecological artworks for multiple environmental centers within the Delaware River (Lenapehoking) Watershed in 2021.  

 

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Partially supported through the General Activity Fund.
Image: Detail of “Wheat Penny Bread Medallion,” August 2010. Part of the “Industrial Harvest” project—an artistic gesture of Herculean proportions about nourishment, food systems, and the City of Chicago by Seattle artist and urban planner Sarah Kavage. Courtesy of the artist.

Critical Dialogue Series: Cecilia Vicuña, The 2020 Jack Wolgin Annual Visiting Artist

Attention Tyler and Temple students: Tyler welcomes Cecilia Vicuña, the 2020 Jack Wolgin Annual Visiting Artist, for a public conversation. Vicuña’s work as a poet, artist, filmmaker and activist addresses pressing concerns of the modern world, including ecological destruction, human rights and cultural homogenization. Her multi-dimensional works begin as a poem, an image that morphs into a film, a song, a sculpture or a collective performance. These ephemeral, site-specific installations in nature, streets and museums combine ritual and assemblage. This event is part of Tyler’s Critical Dialogue Series.

 

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The Jack Wolgin Annual Visiting Artist Symposium is supported by the Wolgin Endowment at the Tyler School of Art and Architecture.
Image: “Quipu Austral” (2012) by Cecilia Vicuña. Courtesy of the artist.

Critical Dialogue Series: Indira Allegra

Attention Tyler and Temple students: Indira Allegra’s work explores memorial as a genre and a vital part of the human experience. Allegra re-imagines what a memorial can feel like and how it can function personally. Deeply informed by the ritual, relational and performative aspects of weaving, Allegra explores the repetitive crossing of forces held under tension be they material, social or emotional.

 

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Partially supported through the General Activity Fund. In partnership with Tyler’s Fibers & Material Studies Program and The Fabric Workshop & Museum.
Image (detail) courtesy of the artist from Grammar of Grief Series (2020). Credit: Dorothy R. Santos.

Akira Drake Rodriguez: Diverging Space for Deviants: The Politics of Atlanta’s Public Housing

Akira Drake Rodriguez is an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Weitzman School in the Department of City & Regional Planning. Her lecture will examine the politics of public housing planning in Atlanta that structured the activism of tenants in the city over the 20th century.

Zoom Link

 

Image courtesy of Akira Drake Rodriguez.

Critical Dialogue Series: Shannon Finnegan

Attention Tyler and Temple students: Through their art practice, Shannon Finnegan thinks about how we can move towards better and more nuanced approaches to access. Instead of focusing on compliance and doing the minimum, what if we approach access creatively and generously, centering disability culture? How do we make spaces and experiences that disabled people not only can access but want to access?

 

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Partially supported through the General Activity Fund. In partnership with the Disability Task Force.
Image: “Do you want us here or not 1” (2018) by Shannon Finnegan. Courtesy of the artist.

Critical Dialogue Series: BFAMFAPhD

Attention Tyler and Temple students: BFAMFAPhD is a collective that formed in 2012 to make art, reports and teaching tools to advocate for cultural equity in the United States. The work of the collective is to bring people together to analyze and re-imagine relationships of power in the arts. 

 

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Partially supported through the General Activity Fund. In partnership with Tyler’s Painting and Sculpture programs.
Image courtesy of BFAMFAPhD.

Critical Dialogue Series: Emma Nishimura

Attention Tyler and Temple students: Emma Nishimura’s work ranges from traditional etchings, archival pigment prints, drawings and audio pieces to art installations. Using a diversity of media, her work addresses ideas of memory and loss that are rooted within family stories and inherited narratives. Nishimura’s lecture is held in conjunction with the city-wide Japan/Philly2020 events. 

 

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Partially supported through the General Activity Fund. In partnership with Tyler’s Printmaking Program.
Image: “Lillian Michiko Blakey” (2018) by Emma Nishimura. Courtesy of the artist.

Critical Dialogue Series: Las Nietas de Nonó

Attention Tyler and Temple students: Sisters Mulowayi and Mapenzi are Las Nietas de Nonó. Stemming from an Afro-Diasporic experience in the island-colony context, especially by circumstances and elements that are present in their neighborhoods, they evoke personal archives via an intersection of disciplines to expose the systemic oppressions that racialized people have lived through generations.

 

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Partially supported through the General Activity Fund. In partnership with Tyler’s Art Education and Community Arts Practices Department.
Image courtesy of the artist. Photo by David Moses.

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